Thursday, 29 November 2012

Zig Ziglar: Quotes That Can Change Your Life






Zig Ziglar died today at age 86. A World War II veteran, Zig Ziglar became the top sales person in several organizations before striking out on his own as a motivational speaker and trainer. 
Ziglar wrote over two dozen books and amassed a following of millions who were encouraged by his lessons for success.
Below are 10 quotes from Zig Ziglar that have the power to completely change the direction of one’s life.
1) “Remember that failure is an event, not a person.”
2) “You will get all you want in life, if you help enough other people get what they want.”
3 ) “People often say motivation doesn’t last. Neither does bathing—that’s why we recommend it daily.”
4) “There has never been a statue erected to honor a critic.”
5) “People don’t buy for logical reasons. They buy for emotional reasons.”
6) “Expect the best. Prepare for the worst. Capitalize on what comes.”
7) “If you go looking for a friend, you’re going to find they’re scarce. If you go out to be a friend, you’ll find them everywhere.”
8) “A goal properly set is halfway reached.”
9) “Your attitude, not your aptitude, will determine your altitude.”
10) “If you can dream it, you can achieve it.”




































In Zig Ziglar’s world, the morning alarm rang on the “opportunity clock.” And “if you aren’t on fire” when you get to work, “then your wood is wet.” And you have to remember that “money’s not the most important thing in life, but it’s reasonably close to oxygen.” And there will be setbacks, but “failure is an event, not a person.”
Mr. Ziglar, a motivational speaker whose “Success Rallies,” “Born to Win” seminars, more than 25 self-help books and countless audiotapes attracted millions of devoted followers with homespun advice on career advancement and moral uplift, died Nov. 28 at a hospital in the Dallas suburb of Plano. He was 86.
He had pneumonia, said his executive assistant, Laurie Magers.
Rising by one’s bootstraps through the “power of positive thinking” has long been a compelling narrative in American lore. Few messengers of prosperity have been able to sustain a relentlessly upbeat and lucrative career for as long as Zig Ziglar.
Zig Ziglar! A human exclamation point! The world’s most popular motivational speaker, as he was often described, was always excited because “you never judge a day by the weather!”
He was a presence at corporate retreats and conferences for firms such as IBM and J.C. Penney. For the general public, some people paid $49 to hear him live or $1,595 to buy his complete written and audio package. He won over crowds with his faith-filled proverbs and earnest metaphors about setting goals and facing down adversity.
“If you’re going to have to swallow a frog,” he said in his Southern drawl, “you don’t want to have to look at that sucker too long!”
Or: “You can get everything in life you want if you will just help other people get what they want!”
Or: “Have you ever noticed that people who are the problem never realize it? They’re in denial. They think denial is a river in Egypt!”
Or: “The more you gripe about your problems, the more problems you have to gripe about!”
What his words lacked in depth, they made up for in conviction.
“I’ve asked myself many times how Zig can say the same things people have been hearing all their lives, and instead of getting yawns he gets a tremendous response,” his friend Fred Smith, the former FedEx chief executive, told Texas Monthly in 1999.
“I think he’s a little like Billy Graham, who has never really departed from the same sermon he was giving back in his 20s yet who’s never lost any effectiveness,” Smith said. “After all these years, Zig still devotes every day to living this life he talks about, to applying some eternal truths about character, commitment, hard work and self-determination.”
For his most fervent admirers, Mr. Ziglar was an inspiring leader who every morning leapt out of bed to the opportunity clock, bussed his wife (“Hey, Sugar Baby”), and willed himself into a positive mindset by seldom lingering on crime stories and celebrity gossip while scanning his morning newspaper.
Texas Monthly described Mr. Ziglar’s love of comic strips, stories about sports teams that win and human interest tales that touched on the miraculous. He clipped them out and stored them in a file cabinet brimming with anecdotes about people who overcame disabilities and poverty and made it to state championships and the executive suite.
“Isn’t it amazing,” he told Texas Monthly, “how we are designed for accomplishment, engineered for success, and endowed with the seeds of greatness?”
Advancement in all its forms appealed to Hilary Hinton Ziglar, who was the 10th of 12 children born in rural Coffee County, Ala., on Nov. 6, 1926. He was raised by his widowed mother in Yazoo City, Miss.
After Navy service at the end in World War II, he was married in 1946 to Jean Abernathy. He attended the University of South Carolina, but he was a middling student and left to work as a door-to-door cookware salesman.
As he was promoted through the ranks of the company, Mr. Ziglar became drawn to the power of self-help speakers and their ability to influence others. He began giving talks at church and Rotary Club meetings, often reprising his mother’s advice and relating his own experiences of smiling through setbacks and grief.
He settled in the Dallas area by the late 1960s, initially for a job training workers at a direct-sales company. The business soon folded, but the demand for Mr. Ziglar’s speaking had intensified. He launched a business called the Zigmanship Institute, now simply known as Ziglar Inc.
His first book, “Biscuits, Fleas, and Pump Handles,” published in 1974 and later retitled “See You at the Top,” urged readers to re-evaluate their lives with a “checkup from the neck up” and to quit their “stinkin’ thinkin.’ ”
Mr. Ziglar spoke often of his religious awakening in 1972 and invoked his faith in book titles such as “Confessions of a Happy Christian” (1978) and “Confessions of a Grieving Christian” (1998), which he wrote after the death of his eldest daughter, Suzan Witmeyer, from pulmonary fibrosis in 1995.
His other books included “Courtship After Marriage” (1990) and “Staying Up, Up, Up in a Down, Down World” (2000). He wrote a memoir in 2002.
Mr. Ziglar, who sometimes earned tens of thousands of dollars per speech and other times waived his fee, kept up a rigorous touring schedule until retiring in 2010.
Besides his wife, of Plano, survivors include three children, Cindy Ziglar Oates of Southlake, Tex., motivational author Julie Ziglar Norman of Alvord, Tex., and Tom Ziglar, who is now chief executive of Plano-based Ziglar Inc.; seven grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and a great-great-grandson.
Mr. Ziglar adapted his maxims to every aspect of his life, not least the golf course. Every day, he sought to break 70 but never did.
“Yesterday ended last night,” he liked to tell himself. “Today is a brand-new day. And it’s yours.”

Saturday, 17 November 2012

A DUA FOR GAZA (by Shiekh Mishary Al Afasy)


TIP OF THE WEEK: A DUA FOR GAZA (by Shiekh Mishary Al Afasy)


 
1,197 

Friday, 16 November 2012

"BUMI AKAN BERGELAP PADA 23, 24 DAN 25 DISEMBER 2012 INI ?

PENJELASAN BERKENAAN ARTIKEL "BUMI AKAN BERGELAP PADA 23, 24 DAN 25 DISEMBER 2012"PDFPrintE-mail

Pihak Agensi Angkasa Negara (ANGKASA) di bawah Kementerian Sains, Teknologi dan Inovasi Malaysia ingin membuat pembetulan kenyataan dari sudut sains berhubung dengan blog-blog dan artikel-artikel berkenaan Bumi Akan Bergelap Pada 23, 24 Dan 25 Disember 2012.


Maklumat tersebut adalah seperti berikut:


  1. 1.Pada 21 Disember atau tarikh-tarikh berhampiran seperti 23, 24 dan 25 Disember, Bumi, Matahari dan pusat Galaksi kita (Bima Sakti) akan berada pada kedudukan selari seperti di rajah 1.
  2. Berhampiran pusat Galaksi terdapat "Dark Dust Clouds" (awan-awan debu gelap) yang boleh menghalang kita daripada melihat sebahagian Galaksi kita.

Rajah 1
Rajah 1
Jadi, andaian orang ramai adalah seperti berikut:

  • "Bila Bumi, Matahari dan pusat Galaksi selari (penjajaran) maka akan berlaku penumpuan daya gravity daripada Bumi, Matahari dan pusat Galaksi sehingga boleh mengakibatkan kemusnahan alam semesta.

    "Bila Bumi, Matahari dan pusat Galaksi selari di mana terdapat awan-awan debu gelap berhampiran pusat Galaksi maka Bumi akan bergelap.

  • Semua andaian di atas adalah tidak benar kerana:

  • "Pusat Galaksi terlalu jauh dari Bumi dan Matahari (165 quadrillion batu), jadi kesan tarikan gravity adalah terlalu kecil.

  • "Awan-awan debu gelap menghalang penglihatan kita kea rah pusat Galaksi bukannya menghalang Matahari daripada dilihat dari Bumi.

Terdapat juga video You Tube oleh pihak NASA yang telah disalahguna oleh pihak tertentu yang menunjukkan Pegawai Tabir NASA, Charles F. Bolden, Jr memberi penerangan berkenaan persediaan peribadi dan keluarga sekiranya berlaku kecemasan; merujuk kejadian 911, puting beliung, gempa bumi dan sebagainya. Pihak-pihak tertentu telah memanipulasi video tersebut dengan artikel  "Bumi Akan Bergelap Pada 23, 24 Dan 25 Disember 2012".
Sekiranya pihak tuan/puan memerlukan penjelasan lebih lanjut berkenaan perkara ini, 

sila hubungi Pegawai Sains ANGKASA, En Zamri Mastor dan En Fairos Asilam atau Pegawai Penerangan En Balasupramaniam di talian 03-8888 8668.

Wednesday, 14 November 2012

Total Solar Eclipse 14 Nov 2012...Subhanallah !


PALM COVE (Nov 14, 2012): Sky-gazers in northern Australia donned protective glasses and put solar filters on their telescopes Wednesday to witness one of nature's greatest phenomena - a total eclipse of the Sun.
All eyes and cameras turned to the heavens over tropical north Queensland as the moon began moving between the earth and the sun, like a small bite which gradually increases in size, although misty cloud was hampering the view.
"Still waiting for a more substantial break in the clouds. Looks like out might be better soon," tweeted Travis, a tourist at Palm Cove.
The path of the eclipse got under way shortly after daybreak when the Moon's shadow, or umbra, fell in the Garig Gunak Barlu National Park in the Northern Territory, about 250 kilometres (155 miles) east of Darwin.
The umbra then moved eastward before alighting in north Queensland where thousands of eclipse tourists and scientists have flocked to witness, weather permitting, the region's first total solar eclipse in 1,300 years.
Totality, when the moon completely covers the sun and a faint halo or corona appears, was to last for a maximum 2 minutes and 5 seconds from 6.38am (2038 GMT Tuesday).
When this happens the early chatter of birds and animals is expected to be replaced by an eerie silence and as the moon overtakes the sun, casting a shadow that plunges the land into darkness, the temperature will drop.
Fred Espenak, an American astrophysicist and world authority on eclipses, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation that while eclipses can seem somehow magical, in fact they can be predicted accurately.
"Certainly within 100 to 200 years we can predict when an eclipse will occur to within a second," he said.
"But the pattern of occurrence is a complicated one. They don't repeat on a time schedule like the seasons of the year."
He explained that when a total eclipse occurred "the darkest part of the moon's shadow sweeps across the earth's surface".
"Total solar eclipses occur once every one to two years but are only visible from less than half a percent of the earth's surface," he said.
The rare spectacle, which is expected to be viewed live by millions around the world, has drawn thousands of eclipse tourists to Queensland with the state government estimating that 50,000-60,000 people made the trip.
They include three charter flights with 1,200 scientists from Japan while six cruise ships are moored off the coast.
Scientists will study the effects of the eclipse on the marine life of the Great Barrier Reef and Queensland's rainforest birds and animals while psychologists will monitor the impact on humans.
Accommodation is solidly booked, from five-star hotels to camping grounds.
Total eclipses are rare, and can be seen from a given point on Earth's surface only once every 410 years in the northern hemisphere, but only once every 540 years in the southern hemisphere.
The last total eclipse was on July 11, 2010, over the South Pacific; the next will take place on March 20, 2015, occurring over Iceland, the Feroe Islands and Norway's far northern Svalbard archipelago, according to Espenak. – AFP

The Diamond Ring effect is shown following totality of the solar eclipse at Palm Cove in Australia's Tropical North Queensland on November 14, 2012. Eclipse-hunters have flocked to Queensland's tropical northeast to watch the region's first total solar eclipse in 1,300 years on November 14, which occurred as the moon passed between the earth and the sun, casting a shadow path on the globe and lasting for a maximum on the Australian mainland of 2 minutes and 5 seconds. Photo: Greg Wood, AFP/Getty Images / SF

A young boy gets ready to view the solar eclipse  with his telescope on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Totality is shown during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove in Australia's Tropical North Queensland on November 14, 2012. Eclipse-hunters have flocked to Queensland's tropical northeast to watch the region's first total solar eclipse in 1,300 years on November 14, which occurred as the moon passed between the earth and the sun, casting a shadow path on the globe and lasting for a maximum on the Australian mainland of 2 minutes and 5 seconds. Photo: Greg Wood, AFP/Getty Images / SF

Totality is shown during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove in Australia's Tropical North Queensland on November 14, 2012. Eclipse-hunters have flocked to Queensland's tropical northeast to watch the region's first total solar eclipse in 1,300 years on November 14, which occurred as the moon passed between the earth and the sun, casting a shadow path on the globe and lasting for a maximum on the Australian mainland of 2 minutes and 5 seconds. Photo: Greg Wood, AFP/Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Spectators line the beach to view the total solar eclipse on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Spectators line the beach to view the total solar eclipse on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Near totality is seen during the solar eclipse at Palm Cove on November 14, 2012 in Palm Cove, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Ian Hitchcock, Getty Images / SF

Telescopic cameras and computer equipment are set up on Palm Cove beach in preparation to run a live stream via NASA of the total solar eclipse on November 13, 2012 in Cairns, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Mark Kolbe, Getty Images / SF

Telescopic cameras and computer equipment are set up on Palm Cove beach in preparation to run a live stream via NASA of the total solar eclipse on November 13, 2012 in Cairns, Australia. Thousands of eclipse-watchers have gathered in part of North Queensland to enjoy the solar eclipse, the first in Australia in a decade. Photo: Mark Kolbe, Getty Images / SF

Solar Eclipse 14 November 2012



Early Wednesday morning, a total solar eclipse occurred in part of the Southern Hemisphere when the moon passed briefly between the Earth and the Sun.

The eclipse cast a 95-mile wide shadow over parts of northern Australia and the Indian and Pacific Oceans.
According to the Associated Press, over 50,000 people came to northern Australia to see the celestial event, and live streams of the eclipse delighted skywatchers all over the world.

Path of the Total Eclipse, Nov. 13, 2012

Path of the Total Eclipse, Nov. 13, 2012Credit: Jay AndersonJay Anderson generated a series of detailed eclipse maps for the solar eclipse of Nov. 13, 2012.
Track of the Total Eclipse Over Australia, Nov. 13, 2012






























Track of the Total Eclipse Over Australia, Nov. 13, 2012




























Solar Eclipse Seen by NASA's Solar Dynamic Observatory